Daily Archives: July 12, 2010

Book review: Heartsick by Chelsea Cain (0312368461)

This book pulls you in from the very first chapter which is a flashback of a female serial killer torturing one of her victims. The victim happens to be Archie Sheridan, a homicide detective who has been called back to duty after recovering from his harrowing experience two years before. He is put in charge to investigate another series of murders in Portland, Oregon, but is he up to it? He is addicted to pain killers, he is separated from his family. and he has an unnatural bound with his torturer, Gretchen Lowell who is now in prison and meets with him every Sunday to give him information on the 200+ victims she allegedly killed.

Susan Ward is assigned to write a story on Archie Sheridan and the recent serial murders of several high school girls. She is young, ambitious and had a rough childhood. Can she handle the unhappy memories while returning to her old high school where some of the murders have occurred?

This is an action-packed thriller that keeps you guessing to the end. The flashbacks of Archie Sheridan’s torture are terrifying and something you want to stop reading, but you just can’t. The female serial killer is an interesting premise and I look forward to finding out how Ms. Cain carries Gretchen Lowell over into her other books.

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Book review: A Rainbow in the Night: The Tumultuous Birth of South Africa by Dominique Lapierre (9780306818479)

Mr. Lapierre relates the history of South Africa from 1652 when Dutchman Jan van Riebeeck lands in the Cape to plant lettuce to 1994 when Nelson Mandela becomes South Africa’s first black president. There are great hardships and great triumphs described and the perseverance of the African people is remarkable and commendable. Mr. Lapierre states in his bibliography that he “wanted to recount, as accurately as possible, a fabulous human epic” which I find he does very well. I admit that I didn’t know much about South Africa’s history and after reading Mr. Lapierre’s historical account have been awakened to the devastation that apartheid had caused for the South African people.

The book contains informative and moving images and the appendices contain a short summary of what each noted person is doing today, some excerpts of the seventeen hundred laws and measures instituted by apartheid legislators, a chronology, a glossary, a bibliography, an explanation and some information on charitable organizations, image credits, acknowledgments and a very thorough index. I commend Mr. Lapierre’s hard work in researching and writing this book and his humanitarian efforts to help destitute children in India, Africa, and South America to where half of the royalties of this book are donated.

Thank you to Mr. Lapierre and De Capo Press for giving me the opportunity to review this book.

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